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The best thing you can do on your period? Masturbate.

The euphemistically-named “time of the month” is as good as any to indulge in our #1 personal interest. It’s very likely you’ve tried or considered it. Why? Because you really, really felt in the mood, as a result of increased testosterone coupled with blood-related pressure on the pelvic region’s nerve endings. More importantly, it’s easy, […]

By Aurelie | 4 April 2020
masturbation during period

The euphemistically-named “time of the month” is as good as any to indulge in our #1 personal interest. It’s very likely you’ve tried or considered it. Why? Because you really, really felt in the mood, as a result of increased testosterone coupled with blood-related pressure on the pelvic region’s nerve endings. More importantly, it’s easy, safe, and there are a number of very valid reasons to do it.

The basics: How to masturbate on your period

What you need:

  •  your period
  • a sex toy
    • If you’re feeling squeamish, keep it external. Our leaf-shaped pebbled vibrator Yumi is perfect for that, as are Yasmin and Yoana.
    • If you’re feeling adventurous, the distinctively-shaped Yulia is always great option.

What you don’t need but may find useful:

  • lubricant While you may feel there’s plenty of moisture already by way of menstrual blood, the blood flow isn’t constant throughout your cycle and if you wear tampons, you might find extra lubrication is actually needed. Grab your go-to lube and carry on exactly as you would on any other occasion.
  • a towel and/or a shower or tub Easy ways to contain the mess if mess-related stress keeps you from relaxing properly – or you’re doing it in a bed that isn’t yours.
  • the right playlist to put you in the mood. Have you given our special “Good Vibrations” playlist a listen yet?

Good reason: When sex isn’t on the cards

Your partner does not feel like it

There is a possibility that your partner may not feel like doing it on your period, and we’re not judging. Most probably, they are turned off by the blood because of a series of (wrongful) perceptions related to hygiene and safety. While you can try to educate them by putting the potential mess into perspective (they might expect something not unlike The Shining’s elevator scene when in a vast majority of cases the reality is much blander), you should ultimately respect their stance on the matter. If they’re curious to know what they’re missing, you can always let them watch

You don’t feel like it

There’s also a possibility that you yourself may be feeling hot and bothered but not in the mood for intercourse. That could be related to a number of factors, from feeling awkward about it (see the next paragraph about period shame) to low energy levels; we can all agree that, with your favourite vibrator at hand, me-time is definitely less exhausting than good sex, and always a safer bet. We’re looking at you, pleasure gap.

Very good reason: a strong stance against period shame

Period shaming: still a thing in 2020. Much has been written about the pink tax and while not nearly enough has been done, things are slowly moving in a reassuring direction. Yet, we’re still made to feel like period talk should be kept to a minimum, or that we’re acting as radical feminists by speaking up about it. The best thing to do to normalise periods and keep fighting the “dirty period” narrative is through open dialogue. By simply talking casually about our menstruation and how we’re seeking solo pleasure during it, while strongly ignoring the double burden of male-imposed social taboos. Speech (and hashtags) can be a very potent tool to shift norms. (Oh and incidentally, while researching this article, we came across a substantial amount of amateur period masturbation porn, leading us to discovering the unsuspected period fetish. We’ll leave it at that.)

Great reason: a recognised remedy against painful cramps

Orgasms have been known to alleviate all sorts of tension-related pains such as headaches, in that they help the body relax via the release of endorphins and oxytocin. The same logic applies to menstrual cramps and menstrual migraines, whose intensity has been shown to decrease as a result of those pleasure-related hormones.

Best reason: potentially better orgasms

We can all agree that our bodies are different at best and insanely complex most of the time. There is no one-fits-all truth when it comes to orgasming and pleasure. However, from an anatomical standpoint, it has been proven that increased blood flow to the pelvis results in greater genital sensitivity, which in turn translates to better orgasms. Whether it does indeed apply to you or not, half the fun is in exploring.

Wrong reason: Because you read how cool it is

… although, to be honest, you don’t really feel like it. As in every other field, trends are a thing even in terms of sexuality and wellness. Nowadays, we are more outspoken about periods, and as a result are more inclined to extend the conversation to period sex and masturbation. Being sex positive never means going against our best instincts. While consent isn’t an issue when it comes to self-pleasure, comfort zones are real and should be abandoned only if we truly feel okay about it. When our period hits, sexual pleasure and orgasms might very well be the very last thing on our minds: we’re in pain (and may not feel like finding out whether solo play is indeed an effective painkiller), we feel bloated and anything but sexual. That happens, that’s legitimate, and we should’t feel left out just because everyone else is raving on about it. And if we change our minds, great, we only have every other month of the year to give it a go and join the period masturbation club.
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